Phlebotomists are health care workers who are specially trained to take blood.

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What is a Phlebotomy?

22 December, 2010 (10:45) | General | By:

The definition of a phlebotomy is the act of drawing blood, whether it is for the purpose of testing or transfusion. Anyone who is engaged in drawing blood, such as a physician or other allied health professional, is known as a phlebotomist. These health care providers can be medical assistants, paramedics and clinical laboratory scientists. There are only two states in the United States which require certification legally to draw blood, yet most people who are hired to do such work do have special certification. Because health care is at the moment expanding rapidly, having specially trained professional phlebotomists on hand to draw blood relieves the pressure on other medical staff and personnel to participate in other areas where they have more of an expertise.

Phlebotomists collect blood in several different ways. If just a small quantity is needed, then a finger prick will do. If blood is needed from an infant, than a heel stick is performed. For common types of blood tests the phlebotomist performs a venipuncture. In order to collect arterial blood a specially trained phlebotomist will collect blood from the radial artery of the wrist or from the brachial artery found in the area in the bend in the arm.